Technology Analysis and Implementation Phase for Sped. Ed.

 

Technology Analysis & Implementation Project – Phase 3

Cheryl Gilbert-Hurley

Liberty University

February 27, 2019

 

Abstract

In today’s educational system, it’s challenging enough scheduling technology training for a new software program that has been adopted by the school district for special education professionals to use for creating documents specifically designed and created for students k-12 enrolled in special education services. Teachers are already facing time constraints and juggling daily tasks, and learning a new software program in a timely manner. What plan of action should be taken? Implementing a plan for online technology training would accommodate a teacher’s hectic schedule, but solving scheduling issues for special education teachers within the school-district. Implementing online training will be analyzed, examined and explained in the following summary on software training for special education teachers.

            Keywords: education, implementing, plan, scheduling, technology, training, software

 

                         Technology Analysis & Implementation Project

Implementation Phase – 3

The Identified Problem/ Challenge

The special education department for the North Star Borough School-district has failed to coordinate and provide technology training for special educators on using new software that’s specifically designed for creating student documents (Halsdorfer, 2006). Special educational professionals are struggling to navigate Skyward Student Management Suite that’s important for creating, uploading, sending and sharing documents with other team members. Teachers would greatly benefit from properly using the new software program that creates IEPs, 504 Plans, and other critical documents for students enrolled in special education services (Holler, et at., 2007).

The Outcome

The outcome of planning software training for special education teachers will be able to learn, use and navigate the new software called Skyward Student Management Suite. Most importantly, teachers will be able to create, download, send and share student documents in a timely manner (Watts & Castle, 1993).

Online training will offer additional incentives for special education teachers, including learning software at their own pace without having to hire a substitute teacher to cover their class in an in-service training setting (Donlevy, 2005).

The Medium

            Teachers will be successful at learning Skyward Student Management Suite to obtain their objectives of creating documents specifically used for students enrolled in special education services with accuracy. A Google Slides presentation will be used for training special education teachers to learn, use and navigate the new software that would be step-by-step, thorough, clear and concise with all the materials embedded in Google online training (Perez -Katz, 2007).

Learning Strategies

Teachers will be able to learn, use, apply settings that accommodates their computer system and navigate the new software program in the form of Google Slides presentation. Teachers will be able to access this training by logging into their Google account used specifically by the school-district. Google Slides presentation will provide step-by-step as the speaker will explain how this software should be used, applied and navigated that’s self-paced in an 18-slide presentation on Skyward Student Management Suite (Education world, 2019).

Storyboard

 

User Interface

            Teachers will access their Google Suite user access by clicking on the Google shared file used by the school-district. Then teachers will search the file called Skyward Student Management Suite training located in learners Google shared drive as a slides presentation format which they can save and download the file for software training purposes. Google Slides presentation will meet teachers’ instructional needs on how to use, apply, navigate and download critical forms for creating and publishing forms for students enrolled in special education services. The main objective of user interface is learning the new software program that’s clear, concise and 1) thorough instructions that would be easily understandable, as well as step-by-step directions and 2) Google Slides presentation format for both Macintosh System Software and Microsoft Windows 10 Operating System (Sohn, 2016).

Assessment

            Teachers will conduct a self-assessment by passing a quiz of 5 true or false and 25 multiple-choice questions on Skyward Student Management Suite in these key areas; 1) navigating titles, 2) locating student forms, 3) properly formatting documents, 4) applying correct settings, 5) publishing, 6) saving, 7) downloading and 8) sharing student records with other team members. A successful outcome will be assessed on these key areas of using this new software with ease, and successfully creating student records and reports for special education (Sohn, 2016).   

Formative Assessment

            School-district training facilitators will check teacher’s knowledge content using a formative assessment app everything from discussion to quizzing, polling, and responses to periodic training video on updates or changes in existing online software training on Skyward Student Management Suite. The formative assessment app can be downloaded on both Macintosh System Software and Microsoft Windows 10 Operating System from Google Play. The goal of formative assessment is to monitor teacher’s knowledge content, and also school-administers providing ongoing feedback that can be used by training facilitators improve their online software training on Skyward Student Management Suite (Sohn, 2016).

Summative Assessment

            Successful training will weigh heavily in the following areas; 1) viewing, reading and studying all 18-slides, 2) creating a username and password, 3) navigating icons for locating  student forms, documents, and behavior tracking, 4)  navigating tiles right on the dashboard, and 5) passing a quiz of 25 multiple-choice and 5 true or false questions on Skyward Student Management Suite. Successful training will be determined if a score is 79 or above, if it falls below passing teacher may retake the quiz  until passed then training will be deemed successful (Rock & Levin, 2002).

Resources/Links

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yvJ2LDFHVI28IOyGzqIbyN1H30LLhC_K/view?usp=sharing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Donlevy, J. (2005). Innovative teacher professional development: PBS Teacherline.          International Journal of Instructional Media, 32(3).

Education World. (2019). Encouraging Teacher Technology Use. Retrieved Feb 6, 2019 from https://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech159.shtml

Guskey, T.R. (1998). Making time for in-service training. The School Administrator web edition. Retrieved Feb 6, 2019 from http://www.aasa.org/publications/saarticledetail.cfm?ItemNumber=4470&snItemNumber=950&tnItemNumbe r=1995

Halsdorfer, J. (2006). Finding time to educate teachers. ERIC online submission. Retrieved http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1b/de/1b.pdf

Holler, E.W., Callender, S., & Skinner, C. (2007). Time well spent. Principal Leadership,        7(9), 42-44, 46.

Perez-Katz, A. (2007).  Teacher support systems: A collaboration Model. Principal          Leadership, 7(9), 38-41.

Rock, T. C., & Levin, B. B. (2002). Collaborative action research projects: Enhancing preservice teacher development in professional development schools. Teacher Education Quarterly, 29(1), 7–21.

Sohn, J. (2016). Skyward adding course learning center to Student Management Suit: TheJournal. Retrieved from ttps://thejournal.com/Articles/2013/05/16/Skyward-Adding-      Course-Learning-Center-to-Student-Management-Suite.aspx?=THE21&m=1&p=1

Watts, G.D. & Castle, S. (1993). The time dilemma in school restructuring: Five primary ways that innovative schools “found” time for professional learning. Phi Delta Kappan,75(1).

 

 

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Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment – Sped. Ed.

 

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment

Cheryl Gilbert-Hurley

Liberty University

February 15, 2019

 

Abstract

The traditional classroom provides certain elements of instruction and teaching methods, but implementing a blended learning environment offers a viable alternatives for students enrolled in special education services. The last decade has opened up new possibilities and opportunities for students with learning disabilities and cognitive deficits, but use of technology has provided academic growth and learning effectiveness within a school-based system. What are the targeted outcomes of using hybrid learning assignments for students with disabilities? Hybrid learning environment assignments will be studied, analyzed, examined and summarized in the following explained and fully defined.

Keywords: classroom, instruction, teaching methods, learning environment, special education

 

 

 

 

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment

Implementation of Blended Learning in Special Education

Grades 6-8 – ELA

The Goal

            The goal is to change the existing curriculum for ELA – Sped. Ed for grades 6-8 to increase online instruction from 20 to 30 minutes and decreasing face-to-face instruction from 30 to 25 minutes in a 55-minute class period that would increase academic growth and learning effectiveness. The intended goal is to increase  a student’s knowledge content in these key areas; 1) parts of speech, 2) structured sentences, 3) writing and formatting a paragraph(s), and 4) properly formatting graphic organizers (Greer et al., 2014, p. 81).

Target Outcomes

  1. Increasing blended learning into modified lesson plans for students, grades 6-8, including increasing online instruction and completing classroom assignments to 30 minutes and 25 minutes of face-to-face instruction, thus allowing blended learning for academic growth and increasing learning effectiveness (Marteney & Bernadowski, 2016, p. 182).
  2. Increased learning effectiveness and student growth in learning proper sentence, paragraph structure and parts of speech. Teachers will determine and test accuracy in these key areas; 1) capitalizing the beginning of a sentence, 2) inserting correct punctuation marks, 3) content knowledge on the eight parts of speech, 4) formatting sentences, example determining if it’s a fragment or complete sentence, 5) writing a thesis statement, and 6) properly formatting a paragraph. Student Bench mark goals starting at 70% to 75% for the second semester and 80- 85% accuracy for the fourth semester which depends on a student’s educational goals (Herold, 2016).
  3. Teachers will train and teach students contextual, social and temporary frameworks used to support successful knowledge content in the area of English language arts. Teachers demonstrate and model the steps using the SMARTboard, and then given students the opportunity to try it using graphic organizers. This strategy should be prepared with the mindset of gradual release after a student has reached a predetermined point in his/her writing which is controlled by the teacher (Baradaran & Sarfarazi, 2011).
  4. Students will correct grammar by proofreading by reviewing these key areas; 1) comma splices/fused sentences, 2) coordinating conjunctions, 3) fragment sentences, 4) recognizing passive and active voice, 5) English sentence structures, 5) subject-verb agreement, 6) using a or an, 7) using lay or lie, 8) using who or whom, 9) sentence and paragraph development, 10) using pronouns, and 11) using strong verbs (Strunk & William, 1999).
  5. Teachers will train students how to proofread, revise, and edit work in order to understand the writing process—from prewriting to drafting, editing, revising, and writing a final draft. This process will provide students with accuracy in these key areas: 1) proofreading, 2) revising and 3) editing classroom and homework assignments (Strunk & White, 1999).

Target Audience

            The targeted audience is intended for hybrid learning environment in a classroom setting for no more than 8 students per classroom for students enrolled in special education services, grades 6-8. Classrooms consists of Alaskan tribal natives, Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Russian, Asian and European descent which the school-district accommodates all ethnicities by ensuring students are provided with interpreters, if non-English speaking (Tindle et al., 2016, p. 112).

Online Elements

  • Teachers will ensure students have access to assisted technology including; laptops, iPads, tablets, PCs, ear phones, software, videos, and other technology to help students reach his/her anticipated academic goals of their IEP or 504 Plan.
  • Students access assignments in the classroom shared file, then click on the thumbnail, open the assignment, answer the questions, save and turn in. Teachers will be able to receive a notification of completed assignments. Teachers will grade and provide meaningful feedback (edTechteacher, 2019).
  • IXL Worldwide – Aligned with Common Core Standards, IXL Worldwide is a dynamic, immersive website offering adaptive learning for students with disabilities. From Pre-K through senior year, IXL will provide fun exercises for English language arts, and teachers can print out worksheets specifically for learning parts of speech, proper sentence and paragraph structure. Students can save completed assignments by logging into their classroom shared file, upload, attach and send assignments to his/her teacher (Miller, 2012).
  • Writing assignments or creating slide presentations, example a 2-page story on their favorite subject or pastime or slides on parts of speech, they will use G Suite. They will complete assignments by saving their work, example as Toms weekly writing assignments, hit save as and send the same way IXL and other assignments (Miller, 2012).
  • Storyline Online – Storyline online is an excellent resource for children with learning disabilities like dyslexia. This website records free videos of narrators, and sometimes well-known actors like Eva Longoria, reading children’s books aloud. Students develop their literacy skills by following along with text as the literature comes alive (Miller, 2012).

Face-to-face Elements

  • Teachers will demonstrate and model skills for writing mechanics, formatting a paragraph, developing a thesis statement and eight parts of speech using the SMARTboard. This allows teacher to provide face-to-face instruction with students by having students take turns answering questions, filling in the sentence, capitalizing and inserting punctuation marks, and underlining correct nouns, adverbs, pronouns, conjunctions, interjections, prepositions, verbs and adjectives. These learning tools and methods will increase student growth and academic progress.
  • YouTube Kids – YouTube Kids provides educational videos on the eight parts of speech, writing mechanics, properly formatting sentences and paragraphs. Students will watch Schoolhouse Rock and take notes during the video, and complete their graphic organizers on a particular part of speech, writing mechanics, formatting sentences and paragraphs and developing a thesis statement using MLA (Miller, 2012).
  • Worksheets – Worksheets will require students to underline the correct answer on parts of speech, example “Lilly went to the library today with her parents. Find and underline the noun in this sentence. Students will be required to complete 1-2 worksheets during face-to-face-instruction, then teacher will handback graded assignments to make necessary corrections as a group.
  • SMARTboards – SMARTboards provide inclusive classrooms by offering many ways of learning knowledge content on ELA that allows students to express ideas, ask and answer questions, and demonstrate understanding in these areas; 1) proper writing mechanics, 2) parts of speech and, 3) properly formatting and completing graphic organizers.
  • SMARTboards touch sensitive surface allows all students to participate through group collaboration. The SMARTboard also allows teachers to address different learning styles- kinesthetic, visual and auditory that fully engages students and facilitates differentiated instruction. SMARTboards can be used to create visually engaging and interactive lessons which students respond well to visuals, especially students with autism. Technology provides special education teachers with an easy way to project worksheets, pictures for background knowledge, or any other visuals to share with the entire class (Miller, 2012).

Resources/ Links

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QMIIea1OcmPZokftJN1ouYRPeJ-HOVnN/view?usp=sharing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Bateman, A., & Soifer, D. (2015). Supporting special-needs students with personalized blended learning. Retrieved from http://lexingtoninstitute.org/supporting-special-needs-students- Baradaran, A., & Sarfarazi, B. (2011). The impact of scaffolding on the Iranian EFL learners’ English academic writing. Australian Journal Of Basic & Applied Sciences, 5(12), 2265-2273.

edTechteacher. (2019). What is G Suite for education? How G Suite for education works?  Retrieved from https://edtechteacher.org/g-suite-for-education/

Greer, D., Rowland, A., & Smith, S. (2014). Critical considerations for teaching students with disabilities in online environments. Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 79-91. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528105

Herold, B. (2016). Technology in education: An overview: Education Week. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/technology-in-education/

Ludlow, B. (2014). Special education: Ready for cyberspace? Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 68. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528104

Marteney, T., & Bernadowski, C. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions of the benefits of online instruction for students with special educational needs. British Journal of Special Education, 43(2), 178-194. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12129

Miller, Andrew. “Blended Learning: Strategies for Engagement.” Edutopia. Herff Jones   Nystrom, 12 Oct. 2012. Web. 20 May 2015. http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blended-  learning-engagement-strategies-andrew-miller

Strunk Jr., William and White, E.B. (1999). The Elements of Style, 4th Edition. New York: MacMillan.

Tindle, K., Mellard, D., & East, T. (2016). Online Learning For Students With Disabilities: Recommendations For Parent Engagement. Lawrence, KS. Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities, University of Kansas.

 

 

Hybrid Learning Environment – Sped. Ed.

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment
Cheryl Gilbert-Hurley
Liberty University
February 15, 2019
Abstract
The traditional classroom provides certain elements of instruction and teaching methods, but implementing a blended learning environment offers a viable alternatives for students enrolled in special education services. The last decade has opened up new possibilities and opportunities for students with learning disabilities and cognitive deficits, but use of technology has provided academic growth and learning effectiveness within a school-based system. What are the targeted outcomes of using hybrid learning assignments for students with disabilities? Hybrid learning environment assignments will be studied, analyzed, examined and summarized in the following explained and fully defined.
Keywords: classroom, instruction, teaching methods, learning environment, special education

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment
Implementation of Blended Learning in Special Education
Grades 6-8 – ELA
The Goal
The goal is to change the existing curriculum for ELA – Sped. Ed for grades 6-8 to increase online instruction from 20 to 30 minutes and decreasing face-to-face instruction from 30 to 25 minutes in a 55-minute class period that would increase academic growth and learning effectiveness. The intended goal is to increase a student’s knowledge content in these key areas; 1) parts of speech, 2) structured sentences, 3) writing and formatting a paragraph(s), and 4) properly formatting graphic organizers (Greer et al., 2014, p. 81).
Target Outcomes
1. Increasing blended learning into modified lesson plans for students, grades 6-8, including increasing online instruction and completing classroom assignments to 30 minutes and 25 minutes of face-to-face instruction, thus allowing blended learning for academic growth and increasing learning effectiveness (Marteney & Bernadowski, 2016, p. 182).
2. Increased learning effectiveness and student growth in learning proper sentence, paragraph structure and parts of speech. Teachers will determine and test accuracy in these key areas; 1) capitalizing the beginning of a sentence, 2) inserting correct punctuation marks, 3) content knowledge on the eight parts of speech, 4) formatting sentences, example determining if it’s a fragment or complete sentence, 5) writing a thesis statement, and 6) properly formatting a paragraph. Student Bench mark goals starting at 70% to 75% for the second semester and 80- 85% accuracy for the fourth semester which depends on a student’s educational goals (Herold, 2016).
3. Teachers will train and teach students contextual, social and temporary frameworks used to support successful knowledge content in the area of English language arts. Teachers demonstrate and model the steps using the SMARTboard, and then given students the opportunity to try it using graphic organizers. This strategy should be prepared with the mindset of gradual release after a student has reached a predetermined point in his/her writing which is controlled by the teacher (Baradaran & Sarfarazi, 2011).
4. Students will correct grammar by proofreading by reviewing these key areas; 1) comma splices/fused sentences, 2) coordinating conjunctions, 3) fragment sentences, 4) recognizing passive and active voice, 5) English sentence structures, 5) subject-verb agreement, 6) using a or an, 7) using lay or lie, 8) using who or whom, 9) sentence and paragraph development, 10) using pronouns, and 11) using strong verbs (Strunk & William, 1999).
5. Teachers will train students how to proofread, revise, and edit work in order to understand the writing process—from prewriting to drafting, editing, revising, and writing a final draft. This process will provide students with accuracy in these key areas: 1) proofreading, 2) revising and 3) editing classroom and homework assignments (Strunk & White, 1999).
Target Audience
The targeted audience is intended for hybrid learning environment in a classroom setting for no more than 8 students per classroom for students enrolled in special education services, grades 6-8. Classrooms consists of Alaskan tribal natives, Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Russian, Asian and European descent which the school-district accommodates all ethnicities by ensuring students are provided with interpreters, if non-English speaking (Tindle et al., 2016, p. 112).
Online Elements
• Students can click on the assignment, answer the questions or tests by opening and reviewing the thumbnail, example questions on action verbs, then after completing assignments and click turn in. Teachers will be able to receive a notification of assignments turned in on their G Suite account (edTechteacher, 2019).
• IXL Worldwide – Aligned with Common Core Standards, IXL Worldwide is a dynamic, immersive website offering adaptive learning for students with disabilities. From Pre-K through senior year, IXL will provide fun exercises for English language arts, and teachers can print out worksheets specifically for learning parts of speech, proper sentence and paragraph structure. Students can save completed assignments by logging into their classroom G Suite account and click sign in with their student account, upload or attached documents and send to their teacher (Miller, 2012).
• Writing assignments or creating slide presentations, example a 2-page story on their favorite subject or pastime or slides on parts of speech, they will use G Suite. They will complete assignments by saving their work, example as Toms weekly writing assignments, hit save as and send the same way IXL and other assignments (Miller, 2012).
• Storyline Online – Storyline online is an excellent resource for children with learning disabilities like dyslexia. This website records free videos of narrators, and sometimes well-known actors like Eva Longoria, reading children’s books aloud. Students develop their literacy skills by following along with text as the literature comes alive (Miller, 2012).
Face-to-face Elements
• YouTube Kids – YouTube Kids provides educational videos on parts of speech, writing, properly formatting sentence and paragraph structure. Students will watch Schoolhouse Rock, take notes during the video, and complete their graphic organizers on a particular part of speech, example completing 2-4 sentences using a capitol letter, an action verb, underlining the action verb, and using a proper punctuation mark at the end of a sentence (Miller, 2012).
• Worksheets – Worksheets will require students to underline the correct answer on parts of speech, example “Lilly went to the library today with her parents. Find and underline the noun in this sentence. Students will be required to complete 1-2 worksheets during face-to-face-instruction (Miller, 2012).
• SMARTboards – SMARTboards provide inclusive classrooms by offering many ways of learning knowledge content on ELA that allows students to express ideas, ask and answer questions, and demonstrate understanding in these areas; 1) proper writing mechanics, 2) parts of speech and, 3) properly formatting and completing graphic organizers.
• SMARTboards touch sensitive surface allows all students to participate through group collaboration. The SMARTboard also allows teachers to address different learning styles- kinesthetic, visual and auditory that fully engages students and facilitates differentiated instruction. SMARTboards can be used to create visually engaging and interactive lessons which students respond well to visuals, especially students with autism. Technology provides special education teachers with an easy way to project worksheets, pictures for background knowledge, or any other visuals to share with the entire class (Miller, 2012).
Resources/ Links
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Zl2QelxPi7ymOaigG1p-Nd6QtXUdJK9N/view?usp=sharing
https://123456osages.wordpress.com/2019/02/19/hybrid-learning-environment-in-learners/

References
Bateman, A., & Soifer, D. (2015). Supporting special-needs students with personalized blended learning. Retrieved from http://lexingtoninstitute.org/supporting-special-needs-students- Baradaran, A., & Sarfarazi, B. (2011). The impact of scaffolding on the Iranian EFL learners’ English academic writing. Australian Journal Of Basic & Applied Sciences, 5(12), 2265- 2273.
edTechteacher. (2019). What is G Suite for education? How G Suite for education works?
Retrieved from https://edtechteacher.org/g-suite-for-education/
Greer, D., Rowland, A., & Smith, S. (2014). Critical considerations for teaching students with disabilities in online environments. Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 79-91.
Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528105
Herold, B. (2016). Technology in education: An overview: Education Week. Retrieved from
http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/technology-in-education/
Ludlow, B. (2014). Special education: Ready for cyberspace? Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 68. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528104
Marteney, T., & Bernadowski, C. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions of the benefits of online instruction for students with special educational needs. British Journal of Special Education, 43(2), 178-194. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12129
Miller, Andrew. “Blended Learning: Strategies for Engagement.” Edutopia. Herff Jones Nystrom, 12 Oct. 2012. Web. 20 May 2015. http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blended- learning-engagement-strategies-andrew-miller
Strunk Jr., William and White, E.B. (1999). The Elements of Style, 4th Edition. New York:
MacMillan.
Tindle, K., Mellard, D., & East, T. (2016). Online Learning For Students With Disabilities:
Recommendations For Parent Engagement. Lawrence, KS. Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities, University of Kansas.

“Hybrid Learning Environment Assignments for Special Education”

 

 

 

 

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment

Cheryl Gilbert-Hurley

Liberty University

February 14, 2019

 

 

 

Abstract

The traditional classroom provides certain elements of instruction and teaching methods, but implementing a blended learning environment offers a viable alternatives for students enrolled in special education services. The last decade has opened up new possibilities and opportunities for students with learning disabilities and cognitive deficits, but use of technology has provided academic growth and learning effectiveness within a school-based system. What are the targeted outcomes of using hybrid learning assignments for students with disabilities? Hybrid learning environment assignments will be studied, analyzed, examined and summarized in the following explained and fully defined.

Keywords: classroom, instruction, teaching methods, learning environment, special education

 

Hybrid Learning Environment Assignment

Implementation of Blended Learning in Special Education

Grades 6-8 – ELA

The Goal

            The goal is to change the existing curriculum for ELA – Sped. Ed for grades 6-8 to increase online instruction from 20 to 30 minutes and decreasing face-to-face instruction from 30 to 25 minutes in a 55-minute class period that would increase academic growth and learning effectiveness. The intended goal is to increase  a student’s knowledge content in these key areas; 1) parts of speech, 2) structured sentences, 3) writing and formatting a paragraph(s), and 4) properly formatting graphic organizers (Greer et al., 2014, p. 81).

Target Outcomes

  1. Increasing blended learning into modified lesson plans for students, grades 6-8, including increasing online instruction and completing classroom assignments to 30 minutes and 25 minutes of face-to-face instruction, thus allowing blended learning for academic growth and increasing learning effectiveness (Marteney & Bernadowski, 2016, p. 182).
  2. Increased learning effectiveness and student growth learning proper sentence, paragraph structure and parts of speech. Benchmark goals starting at 70% to 80% for the second semester and 85- 90% accuracy for the fourth semester which depends on a student’s educational goals (Herold, 2016).
  3. Students will be successful writing proper sentences, parts of speech, and writing a 4-paragraph story on their favorite subject or pastime using graphic organizers and online assignments by the third and fourth semester. Teachers will create teacher-made tests and assessments to measure a student’s academic progress and growth (Bateman & Soifer, 2015).

Target Audience

            The targeted audience is intended for hybrid learning environment in a classroom setting for no more than 8 students per classroom for students enrolled in special education services, grades 6-8. Classrooms consists of Alaskan tribal natives, Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Russian, Asian and European descent which the school-district accommodates all ethnicities by ensuring students are provided with interpreters, if non-English speaking (Tindle et al., 2016, p. 112).

Online Elements

  • Students can click on the assignment, answer the questions or tests by opening and reviewing the thumbnail, example questions on action verbs, then after completing assignments and click turn in. Teachers will be able to receive a notification of assignments turned in on their G Suite account (edTechteacher, 2019).
  • IXL Worldwide – Aligned with Common Core Standards, IXL Worldwideis a dynamic, immersive website offering adaptive learning for students with disabilities. From Pre-K through senior year, IXL will provide fun exercises for English language arts, and teachers can print out worksheets specifically for learning parts of speech, proper sentence and paragraph structure. Students can save completed assignments by logging into their classroom G Suite account and click sign in with their student account, upload or attached documents and send to their teacher (Miller, 2012).
  • Writing assignments or creating slide presentations, example a 2-page story on their favorite subject or pastime or slides on parts of speech, they will use G Suite. They will complete assignments by saving their work, example as Toms weekly writing assignments, hit save as and send the same way IXL and other assignments (Miller, 2012).
  • Storyline Online – Storyline online is an excellent resource for children with learning disabilities like dyslexia. This website records free videos of narrators, and sometimes well-known actors like Eva Longoria, reading children’s books aloud. Students develop their literacy skills by following along with text as the literature comes alive (Miller, 2012).

Face-to-face Elements

  • YouTube Kids – YouTube Kids provides educational videos on parts of speech, writing, properly formatting sentence and paragraph structure. Students will watch Schoolhouse Rock, take notes during the video, and complete their graphic organizers on a particular part of speech, example completing 2-4 sentences using a capitol letter, an action verb, underlining the action verb, and using a proper punctuation mark at the end of a sentence (Miller, 2012).
  • Worksheets – Worksheets will require students to underline the correct answer on parts of speech, example “Lilly went to the library today with her parents. Find and underline the noun in this sentence. Students will be required to complete 1-2 worksheets during face-to-face-instruction (Miller, 2012).
  • SMARTboards – SMARTboards provide inclusive classrooms by offering many ways of learning knowledge content on ELA that allows students to express ideas, ask and answer questions, and demonstrate understanding in these areas; 1) proper writing mechanics, 2) parts of speech and, 3) properly formatting and completing graphic organizers.
  • SMARTboards touch sensitive surface allows all students to participate through group collaboration. The SMARTboard also allows teachers to address different learning styles- kinesthetic, visual and auditory that fully engages students and facilitates differentiated instruction. SMARTboards can be used to create visually engaging and interactive lessons which students respond well to visuals, especially students with autism. Technology provides special education teachers with an easy way to project worksheets, pictures for background knowledge, or any other visuals to share with the entire class (Miller, 2012).

Resources/ Links

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13ClzIebq5_k52mXDCdcmc-ZiVD1mWvG-/view?usp=sharing

https://123456osages.wordpress.com/2019/02/14/hybrid-learning-effectiveness-in-exceptional-students/

 

References

Bateman, A., & Soifer, D. (2015). Supporting special-needs students with personalized blended learning. Retrieved from http://lexingtoninstitute.org/supporting-special-needs-students- with-personalized-blended-learning/

edTechteacher. (2019). What is G Suite for education? How G Suite for education works?Retrieved from https://edtechteacher.org/g-suite-for-education/

Greer, D., Rowland, A., & Smith, S. (2014). Critical considerations for teaching students with disabilities in online environments. Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 79-91.Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528105

Herold, B. (2016). Technology in education: An overview: Education Week. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/technology-in-education/

Ludlow, B. (2014). Special education: Ready for cyberspace? Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(5), 68. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059914528104

Marteney, T., & Bernadowski, C. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions of the benefits of online instruction for students with special educational needs. British Journal of Special Education, 43(2), 178-194. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12129

Miller, Andrew. “Blended Learning: Strategies for Engagement.” Edutopia. Herff Jones   Nystrom, 12 Oct. 2012. Web. 20 May 2015. http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blended-  learning-engagement-strategies-andrew-miller

Tindle, K., Mellard, D., & East, T. (2016). Online Learning For Students With Disabilities: Recommendations For Parent Engagement. Lawrence, KS. Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities, University of Kansas.